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Klout is one of the hottest social media apps out there right now. But does it really matter if you’re only running a real estate business or mortgage brokerage? It’s one thing if you’re working for a P.R. company and trying to get press for your clients, but if your goal is running a successful real estate business, is your Klout score going to attract the right kind of clients? Or are they only interested in what you’re selling, not how much Klout you possess?

If you haven’t heard of Klout yet, here’s a quick run down: instead of the traditional social media habit of running independently and making you fill out a ton of information to get started, all that you have to do is allow Klout access to your Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social media accounts. It then runs an algorithm and comes up with your Klout score. The score ranges from 0Ā  to 100 and is based on your interactions with your Twitter followers and Facebook fans and friends. It also tells you what you’re influential in. People with a Klout score that’s above 50 get access to cool freebies and perks. These perks range from a free one-day rental of a luxury car to something as small as a $5 gift card to Starbucks. It all depends on how much Klout you have. But does that translate into the real world?

While people have been passed over for jobs due to a low Klout score, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your clients are going to check yours out before deciding to attend your open house or apply for a mortgage in your office. A high Klout score could be something to brag about that may attract clients (think of it as showing off your expertise, for example, “Look at my Klout score and my list of houses for sale, doesn’t that mean that I’m awesome at what I do?”) but other than that, your score is irrelevant.

On top of that, getting and holding a high Klout score is a lot of work. It takes a lot of Twitter interaction and Facebook posts in order to get that above-50 score, and in order to keep it that high, you’ll have to spend a good part of each day on your social media sites. That’s time that could be better spent meeting with clients and setting up open houses. Sure, the perks are great, but are they worth it? Not really.

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